On Devolution (by Heather Eggleston)

We are the products of yesterdays and tomorrows. We are aware that while we only exist in the moment all the moments perceived as happening earlier than Now have contributed to who we are in this exact time and space. This is why we perceive time as linear. It is how our minds nicely line up events and happenings and symbolic memories for our ease in processing.

However sometimes that ease in processing causes us to make loops and get caught in a pattern (a mini-cycle within the larger organism’s cycle within the larger Soul’s cycle). Why does this happen? This happens when we feel pain or uncomfortable emotions that we wish to avoid in the future. Our minds are very powerful so we create patterns that help us to adapt to the uncomfortable feelings and so we create new smaller patterns and rather than stretch or heal out of them we cut down our Soul circuit and then our organism circuit and allow our mind to run the show so to speak.

We are only playing with a fraction of our capabilities and become self-limited. And the pieces outside the acceptable loop become fragmented and pool into a shadow self we don’t claim. We make ourselves smaller so we can avoid pain or discomfort. We create “comfort zones” that become more and more self-limiting.

 

Gateways and 11s (and 0s) by Heather Eggleston

1/22/2013

1 + 22 + 6 = 29

2 + 9 = 11

11 is the gateway. It is the place between the twin pillars. It is the mouth of the labyrinth that takes us deep into our inner spaces. It is the guardian at the threshold who holds the feather against our hearts and permits us passage. Let’s make a deal, It says, and we bargain our way out of our skins until we are ready to descend into the skies.

Today seems to be a master number day. A big dream day. A how do I get out of my way and let my Soul run the show day?

Last night I dreamed teaching a class on sacred symbolism. I saw the dancing line of 1 and the spherical dance of 0 as they held balance within each other.

1 is the marching of time. The linearity of the masculine thrust of forward motion. 0 is the holding of space. The whole that embraces. As we move into this new cycle time seems to embrace dimensionality and space collapses into itself. The 1s round themselves out into 0s and the 0s bend themselves into a fluidity of a moment

Time is movement through space. Moments are travel.

11 is the moment we enter the Soul’s possibility.

 

A Survey of Homeopathy (part 5) by Heather Eggleston

Dr. Constantine Hering, another German schooled in Leipzig, became the “Father of American Homeopathy” following his own conversion experience to homeopathy. Challenged to find evidence against homeopathy he instead found it effective and left his station at Leipzig to practice this irregular medicine. Upon his arrival in the United States Hering helped establish the Homeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania (Haller, 2005, p. 681). Hering added another law to Hahnemann’s doctrine. His Law of Cure offers insight on the order of healing stating healing occurs from the most recent symptoms to the oldest and from the most vital organs to the least (Lockie, 1995, p. 17)

At the end of the 1800’s the landscape of homeopathy was a very contentious place. A number of homeopaths wished to utilize other healing systems including allopathy, herbalism, and hydrotherapy when it makes sense for the patient. These doctors tended to dismiss the more spiritualized aspects of homeopathic theory with reliance of the law of similars as a guide but not doctrine. Many of these doctors wanted to heal the wound between homeopaths and allopaths, whose organizations including the AMA were actively outlawing all homeopathic practice for its members. The other wing of homeopathy was the purists who would not reconcile with allopathy for any reason. This split was rapidly becoming a schism when allopathy appeared to triumph with the discovery of antibiotics and the rise of biomedicine. When the Carnegie Foundation released the 1910 Flexner report on the status of medical education it completely dismissed homeopathy and the already fragmented academic movement folded in on itself. Homeopathy became the domain of lay practitioners, grassroots healers, and stubborn adherents to Hahnemann’s principles until its resurgence in the 1970s with the call to holistic health (Haller, 2005, p. 3287).

The excesses of allopathic medicine with its reductionist, mechanistic, and almost dehumanizing tactics left the disillusioned public craving something more personal and homeopathy, with its elegant simplicity, focus on the patient first, rich usage, and many successes has sparked interest. Now more integrative physicians are incorporating homeopathy into their practices through either traditional MD, DO, or ND diplomas. Lay practitioners have their own certification boards, journals, and organizations. Homeopaths continue to undertake provings refining and enriching the materia medica. The new 21st century theme of practical integration offers homeopathy another chance to shine with its simple, humane, and holistically oriented ways.     

References

Boericke, William. (2007). Boerkicke’s new manual of homeopathic materia medica with repertory. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers.

Cuellar, Norma G. (2006). Conversations in complementary and alternative medicine. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Inc.

Hahnemann, Samuel. (2007). Organon of medicine. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers.

Haller, John S. (2005). The history of American homeopathy: the academic years 1820 – 1935. New York: Pharmaceutical Products Press. Kindle version.

Lockie, Andrew. (2006). Encyclopedia of homeopathy. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

Lockie, Andrew & Geddes, Nicola. (1995). Homeopathy: the principles and practice of treatment. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

Rowe, Todd. (1998). Homeopathic methodology: repertory, case taking, and case analysis. Berkley, California: North Atlantic Books.

A Survey of Homeopathic Medicine (part 4) by Heather Eggleston

A third law is the law of Minimum, which states too high a dosage causes aggravation in the patient and so it is best to use the smallest dosage possible to effect change within a highly potentiated tincture. This issue of dilutions caused a great deal of fuss for American homeopaths who differed between those who used lower (less dilute) and higher (sometimes infinitesimal) dosages. Because regular doctors derided so-called high dosages as deception and quackery homeopathic theories abounded as to why high doses are so effective. Explanations from the unapologetically metaphysical to Mesmerism to the “new” sciences like chemistry were actively debated. This issue became a split in homeopathy between a more mechanistic, physically oriented school that worked with lower dosages and a far more metaphysical and spiritually inclined school, which accepted infinitesimal dosages (Lockie, 1995, p. 17).

A fourth law is the law of Vital Force, which offers explanation for how homeopathy works. It posits that the diseased body has suffered an attack on its vital force, which is the energy that maintains life, the integrity of the human systems, and defends against disease (a modern eye may look at the immune system as a physiological system for the vital force whereas a more holistic modality may discuss chi with similar functional language). When the vital force is depleted illness occurs whereas when strong the body can withstand attacks. So the goal of homeopathy is to restore the vital force, which it does by introducing an artificial disease state induced by the homeopathic remedy. This artificial disease state incites the natural vital force to rally and bring the whole system back into balance.

A fifth law is the law of Chronic Diseases, which introduces the concept of miasms to the homeopathic lexicon. In this most abstract of theories Hahnemann says that chronic diseases are derivative of three major miasms (psora, syphilis, and sycosis) and may have a generational (genetic) quality (Lockie, 2006 p. 20). He indicates they are the most difficult to cure and that allopathic treatments only aggravate them. This theory was controversial and often ignored by homeopaths who find it too philosophical to be practical. Oliver Wendall Holmes, an outspoken critic of homeopathy, stated the only reason miasmic theory did not cause a schism in the irregular schools was due to its relative unimportance even to homeopathic adherents (Haller, 2005, p. 2447).

A sixth law is Drug-proving, which codifies the proving method. The homeopath uses varying dosages of remedies on a healthy person to test the resultant symptoms and add data to the materia medica. Following his own experimentation with cinchona bark Hahnemann replicated the experiment on other healthy subjects and found the same results in varying degrees based on the constitution of the subject. And as he and his disciples proved more and more substances the homeopathic materia medica was born (Lockie, 1995, p.12). In this codification Hahnemann emphasized symptomatology over pathological theory preferring to understand the whole of the person, not just the differential diagnosis, through long case-taking interviews and observation. He also insisted medicines be proved on the healthy rather than as silver bullets for the ill whose systems were already compromised (Holler, 2005, p. 227).

A seventh law is that of Dynamization, which states that the esoteric qualities of the vital force of the substance itself is made medicinal via a process of succussion (shaking) and dilution. This process potentiates the poison into a powerful medicine. One can imagine the derision the regulars heaped onto this seemingly esoteric doctrine. As with the issue of dosages dynamization was hotly debated in homeopathic circles. The method of succussion, the rhythm, timing, and the exact method of how medicinal properties were extracted was very theoretical. Hahnemann himself adhered to Mesmerism, a school of thought that presumes human beings have their own magnetic quality that impresses itself upon a substance. As the acupuncturist develops chi to transmute to patients via needles the preparation of a homeopathic remedy involves a dynamic individual succussing a substance making it more and more powerful. Benjamin F. Joslin found a more mechanistic answer to this dilemma by theorizing that the succussion process pulverized and tore apart the original material spreading its essence throughout the dilute medicine making it more easily absorbed by the human body (1995, p. 1001).

References

Boericke, William. (2007). Boerkicke’s new manual of homeopathic materia medica with repertory. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers.

Cuellar, Norma G. (2006). Conversations in complementary and alternative medicine. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Inc.

Hahnemann, Samuel. (2007). Organon of medicine. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers.

Haller, John S. (2005). The history of American homeopathy: the academic years 1820 – 1935. New York: Pharmaceutical Products Press. Kindle version.

Lockie, Andrew. (2006). Encyclopedia of homeopathy. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

Lockie, Andrew & Geddes, Nicola. (1995). Homeopathy: the principles and practice of treatment. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

Rowe, Todd. (1998). Homeopathic methodology: repertory, case taking, and case analysis. Berkley, California: North Atlantic Books.

A Survey of Homeopathic Medicine (part 3) by Heather Eggleston

Following his death the homeopathic school thrived and debate was enriched. Doctors such as Constantine Hering, James Tyler Kent, and many others added their experience and keen insights to the homeopathic lexicon. The American northeast and mid-Atlantic states became hot spots of ideas as significant numbers of regulars converted to homeopathy following positive experiences with its usage. The American south and western territories took longer to embrace homeopathy due to economic and social differences but by the late 1800’s all regions of American had homeopathic representation and societies.

The first societies of homeopathy were formed as alliances of primarily medical doctors. These societies were safe havens for the exploration of ideas, philosophies, and became rich sources of empirical evidence, provings, and discussion. The societies initially seemed to thrive on the American ideals of freedom of thought and democracy and many of the doctors practiced homeopathy within their regular practice and did not see it as an either/or model. Lay healers were included in the societies as respected members. It was not until resistance from hostile regulars forced homeopaths to form their own licensing organizations that a true rift between allopathy and homeopathy occurred in the States (2005, p. 740). By the turn of the century there were homeopathy schools, hospitals, journals, and many devoted adherents.

Due to Hahnemann’s insistence on simplicity the homeopathic principles are fairly clear although the American societies had heated debates and were not afraid to split with Hahnemann’s doctrines. Dr. Constantine Hering, the Father of American Homeopathy, adhered to the Oragon only as far as “like cures like” and left all other laws subject to empirical proof and vital debate (Haller, 2005, p. 943). The first and inviolate doctrine of homeopathy is the law of similars, like cures like. This law was discovered with the first proving of cinchona bark. Hahnemann wrote in 1796:

One should imitate Nature which at times heals the chronic illness by another additional one. One should apply in the disease to be healed, particularly if it is chronic, that remedy which is able to stimulate another artificially produced disease as similar as possible and the former will be healed. (Lockie, 1995, p. 14)

A second law is the law of Simplex, which states that the healer uses the one remedy that best matches the patients overall symptom portrait. Through exhaustive case-taking the healer chooses the medicine that best matches the most peculiar and unique symptoms and uses only that remedy until either symptoms change and another more appropriate remedy is chosen or a cure is effected. This one remedy at a time solution is elegant and allows the homeopath to monitor the symptoms carefully and to adjust fluidly as needed. If the healer uses too many remedies at once it is impossible to tell what is working and what isn’t. Because homeopathy relies on observation and interaction between homeopath (medicine) and patient (symptom) healing is an eloquent conversation. Contemporary classical homeopaths adhere to this prescription of one remedy at a time however there is a trend towards combination medicines for specific issues (for stress, sleep, or a sore throat without regard to the broader patient portrait). These combination remedies are not formulated with the patient-centered approach of the classical homeopaths but in the more disease-model approach of allopathy. Although non-specific they can be advantageous in emergency as they are easily accessible at drug and natural food stores and do not require extensive consultation.

References

Boericke, William. (2007). Boerkicke’s new manual of homeopathic materia medica with repertory. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers.

Cuellar, Norma G. (2006). Conversations in complementary and alternative medicine. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Inc.

Hahnemann, Samuel. (2007). Organon of medicine. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers.

Haller, John S. (2005). The history of American homeopathy: the academic years 1820 – 1935. New York: Pharmaceutical Products Press. Kindle version.

Lockie, Andrew. (2006). Encyclopedia of homeopathy. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

Lockie, Andrew & Geddes, Nicola. (1995). Homeopathy: the principles and practice of treatment. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

Rowe, Todd. (1998). Homeopathic methodology: repertory, case taking, and case analysis. Berkley, California: North Atlantic Books.

Therapeutic Massage as the art of Unwinding (by Heather Eggleston)

Healing is a gentle process of unwinding from a state of old, uncomfortable defense mechanisms, postural deviations, and discomfort into a more authentic state of simple being. As we learn to recognize our Selves in the cacophony of jumbled voices we’ve absorbed during our lives, suddenly we find ourselves more naturally aligned with the primary heartbeat and those external fears we’ve swallowed are cleansed from our inner waterways. Suddenly we are unwound enough to know who we are and how to simply Be.

Therapeutic massage has a long list of benefits. It increases circulation, lowers heart rate, re-sets the hormonal soup of the body, liquifies fascial tissue, and on and on. Each of these characteristics is vitally important for their interrelated physiological reasons. However they all point to a more artful underlying benefit of therapeutic massage and that is the gentle unwinding process. As the compassionate and skilled therapist holds space the guest is allowed a space to recover their natural rhythms. Movement is very much a part of massage. It is, ideally, an interactive dance in which the massage therapist works and the guest is given permission to shift ever so subtly as tense, traumatized fascial tissue loosens and the binds on the body release. As the physical binds release the mental-emotional and spiritual binds are given permission to follow.

Healing is a labyrinth and when we step into it we (therapist and guest) have no idea where it will ultimately lead. It is the process of following the natural rhythms of the body that draws us deeper into a space of primary reality and Deep Healing.

 

A Survey of Homeopathic Medicine (part 2) by Heather Eggleston

The development of homeopathy was originally based solely on the experiments and writings of Hahnemann himself. He was born to an impoverished household but his academic acuity earned him opportunities to study languages and eventually to be trained as a physician at the University of Leipzig and as a clinician in Vienna. He was fluent in eight languages, had a keen philosophical mind, and delved into the complex theories of illness in his time. However the more he practiced the more concerned he became with the harm caused patients and perceived the practice of medicine to be fundamentally unscientific and ultimately damaging. Haller (2005) quotes Hahnemann’s letter to a fellow doctor:

“It was painful for me to grope in the dark, guided only by our books, in the treatment of the sick… To become in this way a murderer or aggravator of the sufferings of my brethren of mankind, was to me a fearful thought (p. 196).”

It was at this point that Hahnemann left the practice of medicine and dedicated himself to translating medical texts and stumbled on the homeopathic watershed moment.

While translating a text on cinchona bark for the treatment of malaria he puzzled at why quinine would be so effective for malaria when other equally antiseptic substances were not. And so he experimented by dosing himself with quinine and found that with each dosage he would develop the symptoms of malaria. So the medicine that was used to treat malaria produced the same symptoms as malaria. This, then, was the first homeopathic proving, the meticulous recording of the symptoms caused by dosages of particular substances and the establishment of the primary law of similars (see below) (Holler, 2005, p. 227) .

In 1810 Hahnemann published his opus, The Organon. In this text, which had six editions total, Hahnemann laid out his theories in the final form of 294 aphorisms. The substance of these aphorisms include indictment of allopathic medicine, the philosophy of his laws, dosages, how to conduct case-taking observations, his theories of vital force, artificial and natural diseases, miasms, and more. Following the publication of the Organon Hahnemann continued to write, debate, conduct provings, and correspond with students. In his 80s he remarried and moved to Paris where he and his wife shared a clinic. In his old age Hahnemann became increasing dogmatic and resistant to any criticism from within the homeopathic movement and his ideas became rigid  until his death in 1843 (2005, p. 511).

References

Boericke, William. (2007). Boerkicke’s new manual of homeopathic materia medica with repertory. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers.

Cuellar, Norma G. (2006). Conversations in complementary and alternative medicine. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Inc.

Hahnemann, Samuel. (2007). Organon of medicine. New Delhi: B. Jain Publishers.

Haller, John S. (2005). The history of American homeopathy: the academic years 1820 – 1935. New York: Pharmaceutical Products Press. Kindle version.

Lockie, Andrew. (2006). Encyclopedia of homeopathy. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

Lockie, Andrew & Geddes, Nicola. (1995). Homeopathy: the principles and practice of treatment. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.

Rowe, Todd. (1998). Homeopathic methodology: repertory, case taking, and case analysis. Berkley, California: North Atlantic Books.